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Constitution Project 2020: Welcome to the Summer 2020 Constitution Project

This guide is for Professor Kenneth Finkle's pop-up class in which students plan performances referencing the U.S. Constitution

You can add some words from the professor here. You have some choices as tMaureen Anderman in costume as Sara, a female lizard, in Edward Albee's Seascapesize, color, and font.

You can also add a picture (this one's of actress Maureen Anderman in costume

as Sara in Edward Albee's play Seascape. It's from our archives.)

 

Getting Started with the Constitution

Library of Congress. United States Constitution: Texts, Commentaries, Historical Texts and Judicial Decisions, https://www.loc.gov/law/help/guide/federal/usconst.php

The National Archives. America’s Founding Documents: The Constitution of the United States. https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/constitution

The Constitution Compared

Constitute, https://www.constituteproject.org/?lang=en, describes itself as “The world’s constitutions to read, search, and compare.”

U.S. State Constitutions and Websiteshttp://constitution.org/cons/usstcons.htm links the user to constitutions from all fifty states.

The Supreme Court & the Constitution

Findlaw. https://lp.findlaw.com/ provides full-text access to Supreme court cases, other court cases, contracts on file in courts about the United States and articles about the law by lawyers (not necessarily as researched as those in other websites, but by knowledgeable people capable of argument from evidence and interest in the practical issues the law presents.

Oyezhttps://www.oyez.org/, co-sponsored by the Legal Information Institute of Cornell University, Cornell Law School, Justia (an online platform that provides access to information about law and lawyers), and the Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago-Kent College of Law, provides full-text access to Supreme Court cases going back to the beginning, biographies of justices, and commentary on oral argument.

Supreme Court of the United Stateshttps://www.supremecourt.gov/, explains the workings of the modern court and provides information about cases under consideration (“on the docket”) and recently decided. It also links to the bound volumes that form the official records of the court for the period 1991 to 2013.

The Presidents and the Constitution

John Woolley and Gerhard Peters. The American Presidency Project, https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/. It can take some practice to set up a good search of this website, but you can find all sorts of presidential documents, from George Washington to Donald Trump, and do a subject search for their words on the constitutional issues of their day.

Archivist

Mary Brown's picture
Mary Brown
Contact:
MMC
221 E. 71st St.
New York, NY 10021
(212) 774-4817